october 2013 programmes

 

'Monthly Monologue: Why it Speaks to Me?'

Hindustani Awaaz, in collaboration with The Attic, presents a monthly series of monologues: Poetry, literature, short stories, plays, essays, nazms, ghazals. A series of eclectic speakers will present/sing/recite their favourite Urdu text and explain why the text ‘speaks’ to them the way it does. We hope this series will highlight a neglected aspect of the Delhi cultural scene.

 

friday 4th october
6.30 pm Readings & panel discussion of “Khud-garifta”  [Hindi and Urdu] by  Ijlal Majeed  

ljlal Majeed will read extracts from his book. Ashok Vaypeyi and Pervaiz Alam will discuss the book, Khud-garifta. Shanti Hiranand will sing some ghazals written by Ijlal Majeed.

 

Khud-garifta (with a preface by Javed Akhtar) is a much awaited majmua [anthology] of Ijlal Majeed’s ghazals. His poetry is defined by his subtle and unique take on existence. For instance this couplet on existence:

Mittii thaa, kisne chaak pe rakh kar ghumaa diyaa
Voh kaun haath the ki jo chaaha banaa diyaa   

Ijlal Majeed is a Bhopal-based poet who prefers solitude.  A retired Professor of History at the Saifia College, Bhopal, Ijlal sahib has been known and well regarded as a poet. His poetry and essays on poetry have been published in both Urdu and Hindi. In Bhopal -- the city of enlightened Begums who nurtured literature, among a circle of connoisseurs and rasiks who can be best described as a latter-day ‘Halqa-e-arbab-zauq’ – Ijlal sahib has enjoyed a reputation as a ba-zauq person and a poet for over five decades.

Organized by Hindustani Awaaz, in collaboration with The Attic and Yatra Books. 

 

tuesday 22nd october
6 to 8 pm “The Way Of The Heart” an interactive talk/session on the practices of Sufism by Sheikh Burhanuddin  

cid:080D9AAB-1070-4D6C-8E6D-7D99D87C9D28@fritz.boxThe Sufi practices that Sheikh Burhanuddin initiates during his seminars belong both to the tradition and to  contemporary life. These methods lead the participants to recognize themselves beyond the veils of illusion and to be separated from the Whole without the over-structures of conditioning. This makes it possible to have an experience of the awakening and to be able to practice it in daily life.

Sheikh Burhanuddin leads the participants to share an authentic experience, opening their heart to the mysticism and beauty of life. During the session, he is transmitting and constantly infusing Divine Love into the hearts of the participants. This process helps them to simply ‘Be’, overcoming the limits of their personality. They start looking at their problems in a wider perspective, with less attachment. “There are no objective problems.  God has no problems! So just give them to Him!” he likes to remind them. The participants are softly pushed to enter into a wider orbit, the orbit of Love that pervades everything.  

Sheikh Burhanuddin Herrmann is a mystic and spiritual teacher of German origin. When he was very young the desire of his heart led him to Mawlana Sheikh Nazim Adil al-Haqqani, the current Grand Master of the Naqshbandi Sufi Order, who initiated and educated Burhanuddin into the traditional way of the dervishes.  

Sheikh Burhanuddin is a deep soul reader with an innate sensitivity and capacity of understanding in helping people with their psychological and physical problems.

For nearly thirty years he has been travelling around the world under instruction of his master.  He leads seminars of spiritual growth and insights to which all are welcome.  

“We are coming from invisible worlds and to invisible worlds we are going back."

- Mawlana Sheikh Nazim Adil al-Haqqani

 

 saturday 26th october

6.30 pm Promoting Our Heritage In North America Through Punjabi Poetry – a talk by Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh 

The lyrical voices from the soil of undivided Punjab, Sikh, Hindu and Muslim will form the backdrop to this talk on promoting Punjabi heritage through poetry. Growing up in post partition India there was a sense of loss of culture, identity and even language. Religion and language has divided Punjab twice in the last generation. What insights Punjabi poets of the past provide on the issues of gender, race, class, and religion? How relevant are their sacred and secular expressions today. 

Starting with the Guru Granth Sahib as a poetic text especially the writings of Guru Nanak, Sheikh Farid, Namdev and Ravi Das she will explore the poetry of the muslim poets, Waris Shah’s Heer and the kafis of Bulle Shah, the author of so many  memorable lyrics of divine love. She will include  Bhai Vir Singh,  the greatest Sikh literary artist of the early twentieth century and conclude with Amrita Pritam, the first prominent woman Punjabi poet, novelist, and essayist. 

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the Crawford Family Professor and Chair of the department of Religious Studies at Colby College. She is the author of several books which include Sikhism: An Introduction (I.B.Tauris, 2011). She serves as the Co-Chair of the Sikh Studies Section of the American Academy of Religion.

  

'Monthly Monologue: Why it Speaks to Me?'

Hindustani Awaaz, in collaboration with The Attic, presents a monthly series of monologues: Poetry, literature, short stories, plays, essays, nazms, ghazals. A series of eclectic speakers will present/sing/recite their favourite Urdu text and explain why the text ‘speaks’ to them the way it does. We hope this series will highlight a neglected aspect of the Delhi cultural scene.

thursday 31st october

6.30 pm  Fahmida Riaz “on why Rumi speaks to me”

This will be followed by a short q & a moderated by Subodh Lal, writer-film-maker. 

 Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī  was a 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. His importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders and his poems have been widely translated into many of the world's languages. Rumi's Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia and the Persian language.

Rumi believed passionately in the use of music, poetry and dance as a path for reaching God.  Music helped devotees to focus their whole being on the divine and to do this so intensely that the soul was both destroyed and resurrected. It was from these ideas that order of Mevlevi developed into the ritual form of whirling Dervishes, doing the sacred dance and achieving  Sama.  

“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.” ― Rumi

 Fahmida Riaz is one of the best-known Progressive Urdu writer, poet, activist and feminist from Pakistan. She is author of Godaavari, Khatt-e Marmuz, and Khana e Aab O Gil, the first translation of the Masnavi  of Maulana Jalaluddin Rumi from Persian into Urdu. She has also translated the works of Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai and Shaikh Ayaz  from Sindhi to Urdu. Her bold and radical poetry collection Badan Dareedah (1973) was Pakistan’s first book of feminist poetry and she has published 20 volumes of poetry and fiction since. She also translates work from English and Persian. Her books have been translated into English, Hindi, German and French. 

Fahmida Riaz has received the Hemmet Hellman Award for Resistance Literature from Human Rights Watch, Al Muftah Award for Literature, Sheikh Ayaz Award for Literature: Poetry from Sindh Government, Presidential Pride of Performance Award for Literature: Poetry, and the Sitara-e-Imtiaz by the President of Pakistan. She is a popular figure among literary forums and activist circles not just across the sub-continent but in different parts of the world.