april 2012 programmes

 

saturday 7th april
6.30 pm “Bhopa- Ravanhathe Ke Soorma”
a film by Meenakshi Vinay Rai

monday 9th april
6.30 pm “The Time of The Gypsies” – a film screening in honour of International Roma Day

thursday 12th april
6.30 pm Take # 3 The Feminist Kitchen

saturday 21st april
6.30 pm “The Fragrance of a hundred strings “a santoor recital by Bipul Kumar  Ray

thursday 26th april
6.30 pm “Sufi: Music for the World” with Madan Gopal Singh,  Timothy Hill,  Deepak Castelino, Pritam Ghoshal and Gurmeet Singh


saturday 28th april 
6.30 pm ‘Decoding Abhinaya in Indian Dance – an evening of enjoying the Navrasas in Odissi’

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saturday 7th april
6.30 pm “Bhopa- Ravanhathe Ke Soorma”
a film by Meenakshi Vinay Rai
(25 minutes)

The film is dedicated to musical nomadic tribe Bhopas who are expert in playing an ancient and oldest musical instrument called ‘’Ravanhatha”. Believer of “Pabu Ji Maharaj”, Bhopas are often termed as social activists of ancient times by researchers. “Phad Vachan”- the unique aspect of Bhopa culture is beautifully portrayed in this film exploring interesting tales, local beliefs and traditional wisdom.

Folk singing
Rendering of folk songs by Rakesh, Raghuraj & Suraj Bhopa

Bhopa 1              Bhopa 2

 

monday 9th april
6.30 pm “The Time of The Gypsies” – a film screening in honour of International Roma Day
 
                              
gypsisInternational Roma Day is celebrated on and around April 8th all over the world to honour the Roma community and raise awareness about their history, culture and the ongoing challenges they face in terms of social and economic inclusion and access to basic amenities and opportunities. 

The Roma constitute Europe’s largest ‘ethnic’ minority, yet many continue to exist on the margins of society despite having lived there for generations.

The Roma have Indian roots, now fertilized by other cultures they have come in contact with over the centuries. The Indo-Romani connection is often forgotten or minimized, but still endures in language, music and cultural traditions.

On Monday, April 9th, we will celebrate International Roma Day at The Attic in the heart of India’s capital, New Delhi.

A short introduction by Dr Punita Singh will be followed by the screening of Serbian film director Emir Kusturica’s masterpiece ‘The Time of The Gypsies’.

Filmed in Serbia and Italy, ‘The Time of the Gypsies’ tells the story of a young Gypsy teenager Perhan with magical powers who is tricked into engaging in petty crime. The film follows his passage from boyhood to manhood, starting in a little village in Yugoslavia, ending in the criminal underworld of Milan.  The film is widely considered to be one of Kusturica's finest and won him the best director award at the Cannes film festival in 1989.  It also has an award-winning soundtrack composed by Goran Bregović.

  

 

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Zubaan Talkies

Zubaan Talkies aspires to be a platform for articulating and nurturing feminist thought across various media and disciplines. Each Talkie will be a carefully curated event and will feature film screenings, slideshows of photography, open-mike sessions, performance art, panel discussions, play readings, stand-up comedy, workshops, readings and discussions.
The spirit behind Zubaan Talkies is to create an exchange of ideas related to feminist thought and to encourage those who are outside of the movement to participate and learn more about issues concerning women. Additionally, Zubaan Talkies also hopes to mentor emerging literary talent through a writing group for aspiring women writers.
Zubaan hopes to collaborate with other publishing houses, writers, artists and academics to create a vital space through which feminist issues become relevant to
the public.

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thursday 12th april
6.30 pm Take # 3 The Feminist Kitchen

Take 3 The kitchen is a delicious site of sustenance and subversion. We think back longingly to foods cooked by our mothers and grandmothers. Immigrant women too use food as a way of anchoring flighty men to the family and culture by cooking foods that keep the tastes of home alive. Food is not mere sustenance it becomes a tender and devious weapon in the hands of the skilled woman.

Films such as ‘Like Water for Chocolate’ are a testimony to the power of love via food.  Books and stories abound about the power of food. The way to a man’s heart might be through his stomach but did you hear the story of the woman who as revenge against abuse took to cooking with heavy latherings of ghee and cream. The husband became addicted to her rich and creative cooking to ultimately drop dead with a heart attack! The kitchen as a woman’s domain can be a site of drudgery but it can also become the path to channel her creativity.

Take #3 of Zubaan Talkies travels to The Feminist Kitchen and explores writing around food. Lathika George, author of “The Suriani Kitchen”, will introduce us to her recipe for vegetarian and non-vegetarian stew, Suriani style, with a live demonstration. As the stew simmers on a flame, Bulbul Sharma, author of “Eating Women Telling Tales,” Nilanjana Roy, author of “A Matter of Taste,” an anthology of food writing and Lathika George will be in conversation with each other. The audience will be treated to portions of stew served with hand bread.


Participation by registration only. Call Mina Vahie at 23746050 or email mina@theatticdelhi.org or rosalynd@zubaanbooks.com to register. Rs 100 per head to be paid in advance.


Lathika George is a Bombay-born Syrian Christian who moved to Kerala in her teens. A culinary enthusiast, she has studied home science and creative writing. She and her husband reside in Kodaikanal in South India where she runs a landscape design firm which specializes in hill station gardens. She is the author of “The Suriani Kitchen”.

Bulbul Sharma is an author and an artist. She has written four collections of short stories, “My Sainted Aunts,” “The Perfect Woman,” “Anger of Aubergines,” and “Eating Women Telling Tales,” and a novel, “Banana Flower Dreams.” Her works have been translated into foreign languages such as Italian, French and Finnish. “Fabled Book of Gods and Demons,” and “The Children’s Ramayana” are her two books for children. She has been conducting art and storytelling workshops for special children for the last 15 years.

Nilanjana Roy is known across the literary world for her column for the “Business Standard.” She used to write a notorious literary blog “Kitabkhana” under the pseudonym Hurree Babu. She now writes a blog called “Akhond of Swat” and has been on the jury for several literary prizes. She edited “A Matter of Taste,” an anthology of food writing published by Penguin.

 


saturday 21st april
6.30 pm “The Fragrance of a hundred strings “a santoor recital by Bipul Kumar  Ray
Bipul RayThe santoor is an ancient stringed musical instrument, native to Jammu and Kashmir. It is atrapezoid-shaped hammered dulcimer often made of walnut, with seventy two strings in Persia and upto a hundred in Kashmir. A typical santoor has two sets of bridges, providing a range of three octaves.

The santoor as used in Kashmir classical music is played with a pair of curved mallets and the resultant melodies are similar to the music of the harp, harpsichord or piano. It is also used as an accompaniment in Kashmiri folk music as well as in the style known as Sufiana mausiqi (music connected with sufi philosophy)

Bipul is a  disciple of one of the greatest exponents of 20th century santoor maestro  Pandit Bhajan Sopori. He has mastered both the "Khayal and Tantrakari ang" (style) equally well. Bipul  has a Masters and M. Phil degree in Classical vocal music from the University of Delhi. He is the recipient of a National Scholarship in instrumental music from the Ministry of Culture. He has been conducting music workshops of Sahitya Kala Parishad, Govt. of Delhi as a Director. He is an “A-Grade” artist from All India Radio and has been empanelled with Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR).

He has performed in many prestigious music festivals in India.

 

thursday 26th april
6.30 pm “Sufi: Music for the World” with Madan Gopal Singh,  Timothy Hill,  Deepak Castelino, Pritam Ghoshal and Gurmeet Singh

madanFew occasions can match the potential of a coming together of a great Sufi musician and a master of the Tibetan chanting technique. Madan Gopal Singh’s authenticity of musical and academic knowledge is unrivalled and the purity of abstract sound that Timothy Hill is capable of producing can lead to a rarely heard cross cultural harmony.

The term Sufi music is paradoxically easy to recognize yet difficult to define. It is obviously related to the philosophy of Islamic Sufism yet sung by many who do not believe in Islam. It is the bedrock of the music of cultures as diverse as those of Turkey, the Middle East and Central Asia and the Indian Subcontinent and Indonesia. In India it takes the form of the Qawwali, The Ghazal or Kafi, where it is sung in Urdu, Hindi or Punjabi.  Musicians draw liberally from the rich and all inclusive heritage of both Sufi and Bhakti poetry and music that to attempt to categorize this intangible and unformalized music is almost a disservice.

This evening The Group Chaar Yaar comes together with the US based musician Timothy Hill, an amazingly gifted and versatile singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist with a broad range of experience with jazz, folk, and world music.  Accompanying these great musicians are  Deepak Castelino (Guitar, banjo), Pritam Ghosal (sarod) and Gurmeet Singh (percussion). They come together to reaffirm bonds of cross-cultural, spiritual quest through music.

Madan Gopal Singh has written and lectured extensively on cinema, art and cultural history. He co-wrote the screenplay, dialogues and lyrics for the film ‘Name of a River’, composed the music for the documentary film ‘Paradise on a River of Hell’ and for the film ‘Khamosh Pani”. He was a Presenter – Performer at the Smithsonian Folklife festival 2002 and performed at the 2nd Sufi Soul World Music Festival. He teaches English Literature at Satyawati College in Delhi.

In a uniquely satisfying musical synthesis, singer/composer Timothy Hill weaves a natural purity of voice with threads of other worldly abstract sound, blending seamlessly into a style that defies description. Having performed with such diverse artists as Pete Seeger, Bill Frisell, Jeff Buckley and Odetta, it is no wonder that Hill's musical explorations span the genres of  folk, jazz, world music, contemporary classical and improvisation. As a member of David Hykes and the Harmonic Choir, he has been a pioneer in the art of harmonic singing, prompting New York Times critic Robert Palmer to praise Hill as "a virtuoso of the Tibetan chanting technique."  

Deepak Castelino is an accomplished guitarist and banjo player who has been performing on stage for over thirty years. Essentially trained in the western tradition, Deepak has scored, and recorded original  music for English and Hindi films (“Electric Moon,” “In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones,””Khamosh Paani,””Milk and Opium,” and ”I Am Kalaam”), theatre and television commercials.

Pritam Ghoshal comes from a musical family. His grandfather Jaharlal Ghoshal was both a percussionist and a singer. His father is a violinist, one uncle a tabla player and another a singer. Pritam started his musical training as a vocalist but switched to the Sarod under the guidance of Pranab Naha and then his current Guru, Ustad Amjad Ali Khan.

 Pritam has performed extensively with Dr Madan Gopal Singh in Kolkata , Mumbai, and Delhi as well as in Switzerland, Italy and Germany, Belgium and in Iran. He has composed music for a dance choreography at the ICCR Malhar festival ad participated in a unique collaboration among three dance forms, Indian Kathak, Turkish Belly Dance and Spanish Flamenco in Hanover, Germany.

The youngest member of the ensemble, ChaarYaar, Gurmeet Singh is a dynamic percussionist who is at ease with all types of rhythm playing. He has accompanied leading popular music artists in a variety of genres and due to his amazing skill, dexterity, and temperament, is always a big draw at performances. Gurmeet is a percussion trainer too who is in constant demand with a variety of educational institutions. An asset to any musical group, Gurmeet Singh’s solid rhythmic backing and precise playing drives the music forward in a most befitting manner.

 

 

saturday 28th april 
6.30 pm ‘Decoding Abhinaya in Indian Dance – an evening of enjoying the Navrasas in Odissi’


Abhinaya is the mimetic expression of emotion through hand, body and eye gestures. It is a codified language of dance. As we go about our daily lives, we forget that there is an ocean of emotions lying dormant within us. These emotions that remain in ‘supta awastha’, as if in sleep under our daily emotions, are the seed of the world. They are the navarasas, the nine emotional states of being, which can make us feel intensely, the wonder and magnificence of creation and our connection to this universe.   

To celebrate the occasion of World Dance Day, Odissi dancers Jaya Mehta and Swaati Vivek invite you for an evening of abhinaya that delves into the navrasas, an intimate evening of dance demonstration and interactive audio-visual presentations. We hope to discover with you, the audience, how classical dance can connect with your life, and how it can bring your life in touch with something perhaps larger and deeper that you have always felt and searched for, but not yet known intimately.  

We want you, the viewer, the rasik to be not merely the 'audience' that views from behind a demarcated line, but a participant who experiences the dance as intensely as the dancer: who feels the love between Radha and Krishna, experiences the drama and wonder of episodes from the Ramayan, finds affirmation in the stories of divine deliverance in an Oriya song written by Shalbaig, a Muslim devotee of Lord Jagannath. Let your heart beat along with the khol, as you watch how Vishnu saved the world ten times.  

This evening is second in the series ‘Dance Travels’, created by the dancers, which aims to take dance out of the auditorium, and into the lives of their audiences. The intention is to engage in dialogues that have no formal tones, no hierarchies of speaker and listener; only a lot of joy and sharing.   

Odissi dancers Jaya Mehta and Swaati Vivek perform in the Guru Surendra Nath Jena style of Odissi, known for its emotion-soaked quality, it's clear and sharp lines, and its synthesis of Oriya sculpture, painting, literature and rural life.  

Jaya MahtaJaya Mehta has performed Odissi at national and international festivals, most recently at the 2011 International Odissi Festival held at Bhubhaneswar. Jaya was awarded the ‘Odissi Jyoti’ title at the Naveen Kalaakar Festival 2008. She also performs recitals and lecture-demonstrations for colleges, most recently at Bharati College’s 'Vasant Utsav', New Delhi. Jaya has a rich teaching experience, having taught Odissi at British School, New Delhi and dance to special children in Very Special Arts, India. She has devised an innovative, new methodology of teaching Indian classical dance, through her very successful Odissi workshops, ‘Mum, ME and Odissi’ in New Delhi.

SwaatiSwaati Vivek has been learning Guru Surendra Nath Jena’s style of Odissi from Pratibha Jena Singh, in New Delhi, for the past 12 years. Swaati has performed solo as well as group recitals with her guru at various dance festivals across Indian cities, and has received awards such as the Pratibha Sanskritik Samman (2010) and titles such as the Odissi Nritya Jyoti (2008). She has also spent over 7 years as a journalist, sharing and gathering views, thoughts and inspirations with various established artists in extensive interviews.